Home » Progress » Art » The Monday Rant #9 – A Personal Rumination on the Moving Qualities of Invisible Art, or The Fascination of That Which Perplexes

The Monday Rant #9 – A Personal Rumination on the Moving Qualities of Invisible Art, or The Fascination of That Which Perplexes

 

***********

Of course, these are just my impressions. I’d love to know what you think. For more information on the subject, I offer the following links:

Southbank Centre, London

The Telegraph (Review)

The Guardian (Review)

The Independent (Article)

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “The Monday Rant #9 – A Personal Rumination on the Moving Qualities of Invisible Art, or The Fascination of That Which Perplexes

  1. This should be the soundtrack.

    The concept makes sense to me, truly, though the enthusiastic reviews smack to me of the emperor’s new clothes. It’s true that we can be moved by what we can’t see; that artists deal very much with the invisible as well as the visible; that presence is important. But there’s also a lot of pretentiousness in the art world, and to charge £8 for an apparently empty gallery — it’s no wonder so many people can’t stand modern art. On the other hand, if it were free, the whole thing would just be a gag. (Maybe that’s why the reviewers can be so positive? For anyone else, maybe the exhibit wouldn’t evoke the real importance of the invisible in art, so much as it would ruminations on the nature of spending and where our money goes!)

    • Good lord. Are we supposed to pay to hear that?

      I think you’re right about it being free, but it seems strange to pay a fee to stand (or sit) in a gallery and think about stuff. I like the idea of thinking, but I can do it anywhere for free, like I did when I read about this in the newspaper last week.

      I think this: “…ruminations on the nature of spending and where our money goes…” is one of the great places to go in thinking about this exhibit.

      • This might be a little tangential, but I’ve noticed that here in Scotland where many of the museums and parks are free, it feels like those places are more a part of the community than in the US/Canada where there are (sometimes pretty high) admission fees. But then again, these are also older cities, so maybe here the museums/parks just are more deeply woven into the community.

I love it when you talk to me ...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s